Archived Content

Next Generation Pathology 

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Next-generation sequencing, digital pathology and other innovative technologies are rapidly transforming the field of pathology and tissue analysis. Along with these technological advances, we are also witnessing an expansion in pathology applications, both in the pharmaceutical industry and research, and in the clinic. This symposium is designed to bring together pathologists and tissue analysis specialists working in the industry as well as in academic settings. The program will present solutions and case studies for various tissue analysis applications and will feature an array of novel technologies.

 

Sunday, February 19
 


7:30 am Registration and Morning Coffee

8:25 Chairperson's Opening Remarks
Suzanne K. Coberly, M.D., FCAP, Pathologist, Director, Amgen

MOLECULAR PATHOLOGY: THE FUTURE IS NOW

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION 


8:30 Next-Generation Pathology: Possible Paths

Carlos Cordon-CardoCarlos Cordon-Cardo, M.D., Ph.D., Irene Heinz Given and John LaPorte Given Professor and Chairman, Department of Pathology, Professor, Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine; Professor and Director, Department of Pathology, The Mount Sinai Hospital

 

 


 


9:00 Development of Next-Generation Sequencing as a Clinical Test and Requirements for Laboratory Standards

Nazneen Aziz, Ph.D., Director, Molecular Medicine, Transformation Program Office, College of American Pathologists

CAP has convened a group of experts who are using next-generation sequencing to actively develop standards around many metrics of the analytical and bioinformatics workflow. In this presentation, a summary will be provided on some of the workflow points where standards are critical.

9:30 Clinical Interpretation of Next-Generation Sequencing Tests: A Whole New World

Wayne W. Grody, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Divisions of Medical Genetics and Molecular Pathology, Departments of Pathology & Lab. Medicine, Pediatrics, and Human Genetics, Director, Diagnostic Molecular Pathology Laboratory, University of California, Los Angelas School of Medicine

Application of NGS at the clinical level represents a true paradigm shift that will require new standards for appropriate test ordering, informed consent, actionable interpretation, access to patented sequences of the genome, and revelation of "off-target" results. This presentation will explore these factors based on precedents from the single-gene experience in molecular diagnostics.

10:00 Networking Coffee Break with Poster Viewing

10:30 Molecular is Nifty…Experiences Trying to Keep it Thrifty?

Jeffrey A. Kant, M.D., Ph.D., Director, Division of Molecular Diagnostics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System

Although molecular-based assays offer many benefits, as laboratory testing goes they are relatively expensive and may provide uncertain reimbursement. Appreciable savings can be realized by doing some molecular testing in-house and by active involvement with sendout assays.

11:00 Opportunities and Challenges of Molecular Diagnostics and Personalized Cancer Therapy

Dongfeng (Dan) Tan, M.D., Full Professor, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, MD Anderson Cancer Center

The presentation outlines principles of molecular diagnostics and personalized cancer therapy, updates new developments in drug discovery by using molecular profiling tests including next-generation sequencing, and discusses the challenges and opportunities in the ever-evolving field.

11:30 Transformative Systems Pathology: Moving Omics to Clinics

Michael Roehrl, M.D., Assistant Professor, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Boston Medical Center

We will discuss proteomic cancer biomarker discovery, cancer exome sequencing, and joint data interpretation of next gen sequencing with proteomics. We will demonstrate that ultra-rapid tissue biobanking is critically important for faithful physiome preservation in next gen diagnostics.

12:00 pm Luncheon Presentation (Sponsorship Opportunity Available) or Lunch on Your Own

PATHOLOGY IN DRUG DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT

1:25 Chairperson's Remarks
Richard Levenson, M.D., Brighton Consulting Group

1:30 Bringing Biobanks to Life: Rapid and Highly Efficient Generation of Cell Lines from Pathology Specimens

Richard Schlegel, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Chair, Pathology, Georgetown University Medical School

We describe a general method for rapidly expanding normal and malignant epithelial cells derived from diverse anatomic sites and mammalian species. Many primary cells can now be expanded and passaged indefinitely without transfection of exogenous viral or cellular genes.

2:00 Next-Generation Pre-Clinical Xenograft Models

Yuzhuo Wang, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Urologic Science, University of British Columbia

We have developed a routine procedure for successfully grafting and serially transplanting primary human cancer tissues into immuno-deficient SCID mice. More significantly, such "next-generation" xenograft models have been effectively applied in a number of translational research areas.

2:30 Translational Pathology Research: The Quest for Predictive BioMarkers

Suzanne K. Coberly, M.D., FCAP, Pathologist, Director, Amgen

With the growth of biomarkers to predict patient response to therapeutics, particularly in oncology, the role of human pathologists have also grown. Classic diagnostic pathology combines with molecular techniques in drug development to match appropriate patient populations to new therapeutics.

3:00 Networking Refreshment Break with Poster Viewing

QUANTITATIVE TISSUE-BASED MOLECULAR ASSAYS

3:30 Quantification and Standardization of in situ Measurement of Biomolecules in Formalin Fixed Paraffin Embedded Tissue

David L. Rimm, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Pathology; Director, Medical Studies; Director, Pathology Tissue Services, Yale School of Medicine

In situ analysis maintains spatial information which is often critical in understanding biological processes. This talk will describe recent developments that allow accurate, reproducible, standardized and quantitative in situ measurements of protein, mRNA and microRNA.

4:00 Power of the Taqman Protein Assay (TPA) for Quantitative Protein Determination in Pathological Samples

Leendert Looijenga, Professor & Head, Laboratory Experimental Patho-Oncology, Pathology, Erasmus Medical Center

Taqman Protein Assay was developed to be informative to quantitatively determine the amount of protein in small samples, derived from either fresh, frozen, or FFPE material. This method allows sensitive and specific investigation of protein content in pathological samples, including diagnostic and prognostic.

4:30 PANEL DISCUSSION: Molecular Pathology as the Driving Force for Precision Medicine

Moderator: Richard Levenson, M.D., Brighton Consulting Group
Panelists:

Wayne W. Grody, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Divisions of Medical Genetics and Molecular Pathology, University of California, Los Angelas School of Medicine
Dongfeng (Dan) Tan, M.D., Full Professor, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, MD Anderson Cancer Center
Michael Roehrl, M.D., Assistant Professor, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Boston Medical Center
David L. Rimm, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Pathology; Director, Medical Studies; Director, Pathology Tissue Services, Yale School of Medicine
Yuzhuo Wang, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Urologic Science, University of British Columbia

5:00 Close of Day 


 

Day 1 | Day 2 | Download Symposium Brochure  

 

 

  2015 Plenary Sessions 

2015 MMTC Prelim Agenda 

Premier Sponsors:

Elsevier 


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Leica Biosystems 
 

 NanoString2   

 

Singulex 

Thomson Reuters-Large 



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